The arts are recovering from COVID!  Thank you to everyone who is supporting live performing arts of all kinds, through your attendance at performances, your donations to performing arts organizations and venues, and your encouragement of all of us. You are valued and appreciated! 

 

The below calendar includes all events open to the public.  Private events are not listed.

Mar24

[from the KC Symphony website:]

Teddy Abrams, guest conductor

Jennifer Koh, violin

Women of the Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

CAROLINE SHAW The Observatory

MISSY MAZZOLI Violin Concerto

GUSTAV HOLST The Planets

Stargazers will revel in Caroline Shaw’s expansive piece, The Observatory, inspired by a visit to Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Eclectic violinist Jennifer Koh commissioned Missy Mazzoli’s Violin Concerto, anchored in tradition but modern and fresh. Conducting phenom Teddy Abrams is known for his unquenchable enthusiasm and imaginative approach to classical music. He’ll bring that zest to Gustav Holst’s The Planets, an orchestral tour de force enhanced by the Symphony Chorus. Holst’s awe-inspiring musical depictions of the celestial heavens are as richly varied as their planetary namesakes. From the powerful music for Mars and fleet notes representing Mercury to the grandeur of Saturn and the mystical sounds of Neptune, this program is truly out of this world!

I'll be playing the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant pipe organ on The Planets.

Mar25

[from the KC Symphony website:]

Teddy Abrams, guest conductor

Jennifer Koh, violin

Women of the Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

CAROLINE SHAW The Observatory

MISSY MAZZOLI Violin Concerto

GUSTAV HOLST The Planets

Stargazers will revel in Caroline Shaw’s expansive piece, The Observatory, inspired by a visit to Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Eclectic violinist Jennifer Koh commissioned Missy Mazzoli’s Violin Concerto, anchored in tradition but modern and fresh. Conducting phenom Teddy Abrams is known for his unquenchable enthusiasm and imaginative approach to classical music. He’ll bring that zest to Gustav Holst’s The Planets, an orchestral tour de force enhanced by the Symphony Chorus. Holst’s awe-inspiring musical depictions of the celestial heavens are as richly varied as their planetary namesakes. From the powerful music for Mars and fleet notes representing Mercury to the grandeur of Saturn and the mystical sounds of Neptune, this program is truly out of this world!

I'll be playing the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant pipe organ on The Planets.

Mar26

[from the KC Symphony website:]

Teddy Abrams, guest conductor

Jennifer Koh, violin

Women of the Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

CAROLINE SHAW The Observatory

MISSY MAZZOLI Violin Concerto

GUSTAV HOLST The Planets

Stargazers will revel in Caroline Shaw’s expansive piece, The Observatory, inspired by a visit to Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Eclectic violinist Jennifer Koh commissioned Missy Mazzoli’s Violin Concerto, anchored in tradition but modern and fresh. Conducting phenom Teddy Abrams is known for his unquenchable enthusiasm and imaginative approach to classical music. He’ll bring that zest to Gustav Holst’s The Planets, an orchestral tour de force enhanced by the Symphony Chorus. Holst’s awe-inspiring musical depictions of the celestial heavens are as richly varied as their planetary namesakes. From the powerful music for Mars and fleet notes representing Mercury to the grandeur of Saturn and the mystical sounds of Neptune, this program is truly out of this world!

I'll be playing the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant pipe organ on The Planets.

Apr21

[from the KC Symphony website:]

Michael Stern, conductor

Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

Sasha Cooke, mezzo-soprano

Scott Hendricks, baritone

GUSTAV HOLST Walt Whitman Overture

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN Symphony No. 96, “The Miracle”

PAUL HINDEMITH When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d

Gustav Holst’s Walt Whitman Overture evokes Mendelssohn with its shimmering strings and exuberant brass. Haydn’s “Miracle” Symphony is gracious, joyous and inventive. Paul Hindemith’s moving oratorio When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d was written to commemorate the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and is based on the poem of the same name by Walt Whitman. Mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke and baritone Scott Hendricks join the Symphony and Chorus in this eloquent music which gives powerful shape to feelings of loss and grief.

I'll be playing the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant pipe organ on the Hindemith.

Apr22

[from the KC Symphony website:]

Michael Stern, conductor

Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

Sasha Cooke, mezzo-soprano

Scott Hendricks, baritone

GUSTAV HOLST Walt Whitman Overture

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN Symphony No. 96, “The Miracle”

PAUL HINDEMITH When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d

Gustav Holst’s Walt Whitman Overture evokes Mendelssohn with its shimmering strings and exuberant brass. Haydn’s “Miracle” Symphony is gracious, joyous and inventive. Paul Hindemith’s moving oratorio When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d was written to commemorate the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and is based on the poem of the same name by Walt Whitman. Mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke and baritone Scott Hendricks join the Symphony and Chorus in this eloquent music which gives powerful shape to feelings of loss and grief.

I'll be playing the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant pipe organ on the Hindemith.